When should I use less or fewer?

When should I use less or fewer?

According to usage rules, fewer is only to be used when discussing countable things, while less is used for singular mass nouns. For example, you can have fewer ingredients, dollars, people, or puppies, but less salt, money, honesty, or love. If you can count it, go for fewer.

Do you use less or fewer with percentages?

Thus, if the percentage turns out to be countable, then one gets a countable quantity. When referring to a group of people, this is usually the case. Therefore, in your example sentence, the absolutely correct choice would be "fewer": Fewer than 10.7% of the people were happy.

Is 12 items or less grammatically correct?

Technically, you're supposed to use "fewer" with countable things like "items" and "less" with uncountable things like collective nouns. A lot of people don't make that distinction anymore, but it actually is more correct to do so. "Twelve items or fewer" is grammatically correct in every dialect of English.

What is the difference between number and amount?

Understanding The Difference Between Number and Amount. The words “number” and “amount” are used to describe how many or how much of something is present. … Although number and amount have similar meanings, number is used for things that can be counted, while amount is used for things that cannot be counted.

What is the difference between further and farther?

"Further" Versus "Farther" The quick and dirty tip is to use “farther” for physical distance and “further” for metaphorical, or figurative, distance. It's easy to remember because “farther” has the word “far” in it, and “far” obviously relates to physical distance.

What is the difference between less and lesser?

Less refers to quantity, lesser refers to quality. Your sentence could be rephrased as "substitute less punishment for more punishment." Here we are saying that the amount of punishment is smaller. But if you say "substitute the lesser punishment" you are saying the type of punishment is not as severe.

Is supermarket a countable noun?

But in Longman DIctionary, "supermarket" is a countable noun only.

Is there a word lesser?

1) is used as an adjective; 2) is used as an adjective in the original / positive form (not comparative or superlative). … the word less is derived from the comparative, but it is not used comparatively in this sentence. In "the lesser of the two evils, " less could work, but lesser is more common in this sense.

Is lesser grammatically correct?

It would have to either be "less than" or "lesser" only. You would say less than or the lesser of. Not lesser than. However, it largely depends on the sentence in which you're using your particular example, as it may be that using 'fewer than' instead of 'less than' is correct.

Is it one less or one fewer?

A. If the countable noun is plural, choose fewer; if it's singular, choose less. … When it says to reserve less for mass nouns, it means singular mass nouns.) One is always singular: there is one less food group in the new pyramid; there is one less number in this column.

Is much fewer grammatically correct?

Many is an adjective, while much is an adverb. As such, many cannot modify the adjective fewer; only an adverb can modify an adjective. Much fewer is simply more correct than many fewer, despite its cacophony. Many modifies a noun: many apples.

Is lesser than grammatically correct?

It would have to either be "less than" or "lesser" only. You would say less than or the lesser of. Not lesser than. However, it largely depends on the sentence in which you're using your particular example, as it may be that using 'fewer than' instead of 'less than' is correct.

Is it to who or to whom?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”' or “'she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.